Instructions: Each of the following passages contains one of the fallacies we have studied so far:

Fallacy Definition
Loaded question Asking a question with a false or debatable presupposition.
Question-begging language Using language that restates a conclusion rather than provide evidence for it.
Equivocation Using an ambiguous word, phrase or sentence to confuse or mislead.
Accent Changing the meaning of a sentence that is unambiguous in the context by stressing or omitting words in it.
Composition Arguing that what is true of the parts must be true of the whole, or using a general term distributively in the premises but collectively in the conclusion.
Division Arguing that what is true of the whole must be true of the parts, or using a general term collectively in the premises but distributively in the conclusion.
Pooh-poohing Dismissing, rather than refuting, a legitimate point or argument.
Shifting the burden of proof/appeal to ignorance Asking others to prove a view is wrong, rather than providing evidence that it is right.
Appeal to hate Arousing irrelevant feelings of hate rather than providing evidence for your point of view.
Appeal to fear Arousing irrelevant feelings of fear rather than providing evidence for your point of view.
Appeal to pity Arousing irrelevant feelings of pity rather than providing evidence for your point of view.
Appeal to the crowd Arousing irrelevant feelings of identity rather than providing evidence for your point of view.
Ignoring the issue Rather than address the issue at hand, you change the subject.

For each passage, explain what is wrong and choose the appropriate label.